Searching for Hugo — corrections

Searching for Hugo

A note to those of you whose copy of Searching for Hugo was printed before November Searching for Hugo ss2014 (you can find the date of printing on the last page): There were several mistakes which were pointed out to me by Rabbi N. Aronson of Manchester UK and corrected in subsequent printings. On page 224/225, in the letter of Sept 8, 1915, there appears an abbreviation which was transcribed as רוה’ש and thus translated as ראש השנה. In fact it says כוח’ט, an acronym for כתיבה וחתימה טובה Ketivah VeChatimah Tovah. This means: “(May you be) written and signed (in the heavenly books) for the good”, a very traditional greetings at the time of the Jewish New Year. On page 236/237 the postcard stamped 15.9.15 starts with the words “nach Suckes kommen Esrokem”. I wrote that Suckes and Esrokem are both Jewish holidays, knowing that Suckes (Sukkot in Hebrew) is a Jewish holiday and thinking that Esrokem referred to Esru Chag, which comes a day after. Rabbi Aronson pointed out that Esrokem (Etrogim in Hebrew, singular Etrog) are a type of citron which are used during Suckes, not afterwards. Thus the saying, “nach Suckes kommen Esrokem,” has a meaning similar to “it may be late, but still…” or, “better late than never.” This makes sense considering the contents of Aunt Jettchen’s postcard.

Another mistake was pointed out to me by Ruth Marcus of Tel Aviv. The signature of the letter on page 313 from the Secretary of the Grodno Jewish Community was misread and written on pages 312 and 313 as A. Schulz. His name was actually Aaron Schulkes. Ruth informed me that his grandson lives in Australia.

How about you — if you’ve found any errors in the book, please share them in the comments below…

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One thought on “Searching for Hugo — corrections

  1. Another correction: Page 282 and 317 gave the date for the German takeover of Grodno from the Russians as September 5, 1915. The actual date was September 3, 1915. This error has been corrected for future printings.

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